Partners – Wuxly Movement

Partners

We are happy to collaborate with organizations that help build a better future for everybody. 

The jackets that you trade-in through the Wuxly Trade-Up Program are given a second life and help the members of the following organizations. 

 

Who they are? 

The founders of Toronto food recovery program Second Harvest, Joan Clayton and Ina Andre, became aware of the urgent need for decent clothing for people relying on social service agencies. They registered Brands for Canada Ontario (formerly known as Windfall Basics) as a charity in 1992. By 1996, the organization was receiving and distributing more than 9,000 pieces of clothing per month. Since 2011, we have been receiving more than 900,000 pieces of clothing, personal care items and housewares. BFCO (Windfall Basics) was rated as the number one most cost-effective charity in Canada by MoneySense Magazine in 2010 and 2013.

What they do? 

Brands for Canada provide NEW, donated clothing, plus NEW personal care and NEW houseware items, at no cost, to people living in poverty.

These items are collected from participating brands across Canada and distributed to those in need through specifically selected, trusted social service agencies.

BFC is building a network of distribution partner agencies across the country. They serve a broad scope of Canadians—the homeless, abused women and children, at-risk youth, immigrants and refugees, people with physical or mental disabilities and people enrolled in job training or job search programs.



Who they are?

Refuge Des Jeunes De Montreal opened its doors to young men aged 18-25 in 1989.  Since then, the Refuge has offered shelter to 20 000 young men with 125 of them spending time in the social housing units. These young men came from different places: Montréal, elsewhere in Québec, other Canadian provinces and other countries. Every action undertaken by the Refuge is motivated by the desire to integrate homeless youth and improve their living conditions.

What they do?

To support troubled and homeless young men aged 17 to 25, and to help improve their living conditions.

  • Develop and continue activities to improve the living conditions of troubled and homeless young men aged 17 to 25.
  • Build and maintain one or more youth shelters.
  • Provide goods and services to answer primary needs (shelter, bed, personal hygiene and first aid).
  • Seek to develop a trusting relationship with these youths through warmth and hospitality.
  • Offer support, orientation, education and counseling services.
  • Create services or activities to avoid youth homelessness (young men between 17 and 25).
  • Promote the engagement and accountability of the youths hosted at the Refuge.
  • Raise public awareness of the conditions of troubled and homeless young men.
  • Support activities to defend and promote troubled and homeless youths’ rights.

 

 

 

Who they are?

Youth in Transition was incorporated in 1989 to address the needs of homeless and at-risk youth in the Fredericton and surrounding region.  It is a registered charity that operates Chrysalis House. Chrysalis House was opened in 1996 as a long-term transitional residence for female youth. In 2014, Chrysalis House went co-ed and now serves all youth between the ages of 16 and 19 who find themselves without safe, stable and secure housing.

 

What They Do?

At Chrysalis House, we provide a nurturing home for our youth to mend their past hurts and a supportive and engaging environment for them to develop essential life skills.

We believe that every human being deserves to have a home; one that provides respect, safety and stability, nutritious meals and every opportunity to succeed.

Mandate:

  • Provide homeless youth with a safe, stable and secure living environment
  • Facilitate personal growth and life-skills training through in-house programs.
  • Provide opportunities for the development of physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being and social skills development within individual abilities.
  • When appropriate, refer to outside resources.
  • Support and assist residents in completing high school, and in preparing for post-secondary education and/or work.
  • Through positive role-modeling and mentorship, assist residents to become independent, active and contributing members of society.

 

 

 

Who they are?

We serve 14 municipalities in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia: Vancouver, Victoria, Surrey, New Westminster, West Vancouver, North Vancouver (City and District), Burnaby, Langley, Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Mission and Maple Ridge. Including emergency and extreme weather shelters, Lookout houses more than 1,400 people each night.

Lookout’s multiple services include: 18 outreach teams, 2 community resource centres, medical and dental clinic, food bank, needle distribution and community cleanup, HIV and Hep C supports, 3 social enterprises, numerous peer and employment programs and youth counselling programs. These services collectively serve more than 2,500 people daily.

Lookout provides non-judgmental, non-sectarian services to individuals coping with a wide variety of challenges including poverty, mental illness, substance use, trauma, mental and/or physical disabilities, chronic health illnesses, financial and legal issues – or those simply unable to cope.

 

What They Do?

Lookout Housing and Health Society provides non-judgmental, non-sectarian, services to adults who cope with a wide variety of challenges including mental illness, addictions, chronic health conditions (including HIV/AIDS), physical disabilities, social dysfunctions, legal concerns or more frequently a combination of issues. Currently, Lookout operates shelters, transitional, independent and permanent supportive housing, drop-in resource centres, outreach, and health services from our 32 sites in 11 municipalities.

Each Lookout site actively participates as members in local community advisory committees and neighbours to research, develop, plan, and educate the community about new and existing housing facilities and the management of day to day operations.

Lookout prides itself on a positive flow of tenants through the housing continuum from outreach, to emergency shelter, to transitional housing, to supportive housing and when achievable, market housing. In 2016-17, 67.6% of Lookout tenants made positive changes in their housing situations. Lookout tenant Support Workers assist residents moving towards independence through identifying needs, creating case plans and meeting personal housing goals. However, with limited access to social housing options, our tenants have difficulty moving beyond supportive housing.

 


 

Who they are?

The Mustard Seed has been serving people experiencing poverty and homelessness in Alberta since the 80’s.  It has become a haven for those needing help, which is offered through open hands with unconditional love.

What they do?

Building Community. Growing Hope.  Supporting Change. At The Mustard Seed, we help meet he basic needs of shelter, food, clothing and acceptance for men and women experiencing poverty, and work with them to find sustainable housing and employment.


Who they are? 

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is the largest animal rights organization in the world, with more than 6.5 million members and supporters.

PETA focuses its attention on the four areas in which the largest numbers of animals suffer the most intensely for the longest periods of time: in laboratories, in the food industry, in the clothing trade, and in the entertainment industry. We also work on a variety of other issues, including the cruel killing of rodents, birds, and other animals who are often considered “pests” as well as cruelty to domesticated animals.

What they do? 

PETA works through public education, cruelty investigations, research, animal rescue, legislation, special events, celebrity involvement, and protest campaigns.

 

 

 

Who they are?

"The animal rights movement is growing at an exponential rate all over the world and Toronto is no exception. Every day, individuals and organizations are planning and implementing actions that educate and raise awareness about animal rights issues and demand change. Whether you are an activist or a member of the public interested in animal rights issues and events in Toronto and surrounding areas, this is the place to go."

What they do?

Animal Rights Toronto supports all the organizations that hold events in an around the GTA, vigorously fighting for animal rights.  Demanding the ethical treatment of animals is at the forefront of Animal Rights Agenda. Animal Rights Toronto encourages people everywhere to learn more about their animal rights events, and what they can do to enforce the ethical treatment of animals.

 

Who they are?

Eva’s is an award-winning organization that provides shelter, transitional housing, and programming to help homeless and at-risk youth reach their potential to lead productive, self-sufficient, and healthy lives.

What they do?

Eva’s is the bridge to help young people find:

  • a safe place and belonging
  • permanency and housing
  • connection to community and their future

We work with each young person to empower them to develop an action plan to achieve their goals and dreams. We meet their short-term immediate needs and provide the skills, training, and support they need in the long run.